Research

Shuar Health and Life History Projectecuador3v3

Collaborators

Theresa Gildner, University of Oregon; Melissa Liebert, University of Oregon; Felicia Madimenos, CUNY Queens; Josh Snodgrass, University of Oregon; Larry Sugiyama, University of Oregon; Samuel Urlacher, Harvard University; Aaron Blackwell, UC Santa Barbara;

About

The Shuar Health and Life History Project is part of the UCSB Center for Evolutionary Psychology’s Human Universals Project, and is a collaborative effort involving researchers from the University of Oregon, UCSB Center for Evolutionary Psychology, UCLA, the Shuar Federation, and the Ecuadorian Health Ministry Hospital in Sucúa, Ecuador.

The goal is to conduct a wide range of integrated studies in the Morona-Santiago region of Ecuador over the next four years. The range of conditions experienced by Shuar provides an excellent opportunity to test evolutionary life history predictions, as well as the universality of hypothesized psychological adaptations.  Studies will investigate Shuar health, subsistence, economy, parenting, reasoning, and demography.  For instance, preliminary data on over 2000 Shuar schoolchildren collected by our Ecuadorian colleagues show significant variation in child health both within and between villages, and between areas with different levels of acculturation and road access.

Select Publications and Presentations

Cepon-Robins et al. 2014. Prevalence and distribution of soil transmitted helminths among the Shuar of Ecuador. The Journal of Parasitology, In-press. (link to article)

Gildner TE, Cepon-Robins TJ, Liebert MA, Urlacher SS, Madimenos FC, Snodgrass JJ, Sugiyama LS. 2016. Regional variation in soil-transmitted helminth infection by age cohort and sex: health effects of market integration among the indigenous Shuar of Amazonian Ecuador. Journal of Physiological Anthropology 35:28 (link to article)

Urlacher SS, Liebert MA, Snodgrass JJ, Blackwell AD, Cepon-Robins TJ, Gildner TE, Madimenos FC, Amir D, Bribiescas RG, Sugiyama LS. 2016. Heterogeneous effects of market integration on subadult body size and nutritional status among the Shuar of Amazonian Ecuador. Annals of Human Biology 43: 316-329 (link to article)

Urlacher SS, Blackwell AD, Liebert MA, Madimenos FC, Cepon-Robins TJ, Gildner TE, Snodgrass JJ, Sugiyama LS. 2016. Physical growth of the Shuar: Height, weight, and BMI references for an indigenous Amazonian population. American Journal of Human Biology 28 (1): 16-30.

Urlacher SS, Snodgrass JJ, Liebert MA, Cepon-Robins TJ, Gildner TE, Sugiyama LS. 2016. Brief Communication: The application of knemometry to measure childhood short-term growth among the indigenous Shuar of Ecuador. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 160: 353-357 (link to article)

Madimenos FC, Liebert, MA, Cepon TJ, Snodgrass JJ, and Sugiyama LS. 2015. Determining osteoporosis risk in older Colono adults from rural Amazonian Ecuador. American Journal of Human Biology 27(1): 139-142.

Liebert MA, Snodgrass JJ, Madimenos FC, Cepon TJ, Blackwell AD, Sugiyama LS. 2013. Implications of market integration for cardiovascular and metabolic health among an indigenous Amazonian Ecuadorian population. Ann Hum Biol (link to article).

Madimenos FC, Snodgrass JJ, Blackwell AD, Liebert MA, Cepon TJ, Sugiyama LS. 2011. Normative calcaneal quantitative ultrasound data for the indigenous Shuar and non-Shuar Colonos of the Ecuadorian Amazon. Arch Osteoporosis (link to article).

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Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE – World Health Organization)

About

I work on the Uganda and India physical activity substudies to extract, organize, and analyze data on accelerometry/physical activity using Actigraphy GT3x accelerometers to understand health and physical activity in older adults form around the world.

Website: http://www.bonesandbehavior.org/sage/

Publications

Snodgrass JJ, Liebert MA, Cepon-Robins TJ, Barrett TM, Mathur A, Chatterji S, Kowal P. 2015. Accelerometer-measured physical activity among older adults in urban India: Results of a study on global AGEing and adult health substudy. American Journal of Human Biology 28 (3): 412-420, DOI: 10.1002/ajhb.22803.

Barrett TM, Liebert MA, Schrock JM, Cepon-Robins TJ, Mathur A, Agarwal H, Kowal P, Snodgrass JJ. 2015. Physical function and activity among older adults in Johpur, India. Annals of Human Biology, DOI: 10.3109/03014460.2015.1103901.

 

Metabolic Adaptation and Health Change Among Indigenous Siberians

Collaborators

James Josh Snodgrass, University of Oregon (Advisor); Bill Leonard, Northwestern University

About

I am part of an ongoing research project in Northeastern Siberia that includes scientists from Russian and the United States.  The project is aimed at understanding adaptation to circumpolar environments, as well as evaluating the effects of economic and social change on health

Publications and Presentations

Cepon et al. 2011. Circumpolar Adaptation, Social Change, and the Development of Autoimmune
Thyroid Disorders Among the Yakut (Sakha) of Siberia. Am J Hum Bio

Cepon et al. 2010. Evidence of autoimmune thyroid disorders among the Yakut of Siberia. American Journal of Human Biology.

Cepon et al. 2009. Anthropometric and Lifestyle Correlates of Blood Pressure among Indigenous Siberians. American Journal of Human Biology 20(2).

Cepon et al. 2009. Evolutionary Medicine and Hypertension among Indigenous Siberians. Presented at the Northwest Anthropology Conference, April 9-11, 2009, Newport, Oregon.

Cepon et al. 2009 Anthropometric and sociocultural correlates of blood pressure in the Yakut (Sakha) of Siberia.  Masters Paper.

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Bones and Behavior

Collaborators

Organizers:
Susan C. Antón, Department of Anthropology, NYU (website)
J. Josh Snodgrass, Department of Anthropology, University of Oregon (website)

Participants:
Christian Crowder, Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, New York
Anthony Di Fiore, Department of Anthropology, NYU (website)
Dana L. Duren, Department of Community Health, Wright State University (website)
Eduardo Fernandez-Duque, Department of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania (website)
William R. Leonard, Department of Anthropology, Northwestern University (website)
Steven R. Leigh, Department of Anthropology, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (website)
W. Scott McGraw, Department of Anthropology, Ohio State University (website)
Richard J. Sherwood, Department of Community Health, Wright State University (website)
Sara Stinson, Department of Anthropology, City University of New York (website)
Phoebe Stubblefield, Department of Anthropology, University of North Dakota (website)
Trudy R. Turner, Department of Anthropology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (website)
Claudia R. Valeggia, Department of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania (website)
Frances J. White, Department of Anthropology, University of Oregon (website)

Graduate Student Participants:
Felicia C. Madimenos, Department of Anthropology, University of Oregon (website)
Emily R. Middleton, Department of Anthropology, NYU
Christopher A. Schmitt, Department of Anthropology, NYU (website)

Project Assistants:
Sean Badger, Department of Anthropology, University of Oregon
Tara Cepon, Department of Anthropology, University of Oregon
Cindy Kirchmeier, Department of Anthropology, University of Oregon

About

The Bones and Behavior working group combines biological anthropologists with interest in paleopathology, anthropometrics, and primatology to develop an integrative approach to research questions concerning primate adaptation. The aim was to set the agenda for future research initiatives for this new synthesis, and to generate a measurement protocol that maximizes our ability to link behavioral, biological, and skeletal databases. We are also working to establish research groups to address evolutionary questions in an explicitly collaborative fashion, as well as to establish a database that organizes and distributes data on human and primate biology and behavior.

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